Family Tent Store: Equipment Necessary for a Successful Family Camping Trip

We found, through experience, that the first accessory we needed was a fold-up camp wagon. This enables us to transport the camping equipment from the car to the campsite without having to make as many trips to the vehicle. There are many manufacturers of this vehicle readily available, but we found that the “Coleman” foldable camp wagon served us better than some of the other types.

Next in line would be “Safety Matches”. If you are camping in an area that allows for open fires, this is a must have item. We always brought two boxes of the safety matches and put them in zip lock bags to prevent them from getting wet and stored it with our “dry goods” supplies. A necessary accompaniment to the matches is some kind of tinder to start the kindling, before adding larger pieces of wood. Many people have their own ways of appropriating this. Many use the lint from dryers while others use “steel wool”. Kindling, such as dry grass, leaves or twigs may be found at the campsite, but it is suggested that you have a back-up.

The next item we will have to have, if we will be having a campfire is a “camp ax or hatchet”. If the camping area allows us to use local resources, this a must have item. We will need this to cut our firewood and also to drive in tent stakes. They are readily available at local camping/sporting goods stores. They can also be purchased online, ranging in prices from $18 to $70.

There are general rules in having a campfire, that should be stringently observed. It goes without saying, that children and animals should be observed to ensure that they do not go too near the campfire. I have included in the next part, a link to an article that is put out by the US Park Services that should be read, in regards to campfires.

If your Family Camping Trip will be to a US Parks, Campground, you should go to http://www.nps.gov/articles/campfires.htm and see their recommendations. These guidelines should also apply, even if your camping trip is not a national camping ground.

Proper sleeping bags from time of year, plentiful drinking water (two liters per day per person) and please don’t forget the toilet paper and other items needed to make your Family Camping Trip enjoyable.

This article was written to try, and assist in making the Family Camping Trip as enjoyable as possible and the start of building “Family Memories”. We hope this article has offered suggestions that you may find useful. Enjoy yourselves and “Happy Trails”.

Top Camping Tips For a Smooth Trip

Anyone who has ever been camping will have a few camping tips to share, and so here are just a few that I've acquired over time. I do not claim to have invented these ideas but they are things that have stuck in my head. Some you may have heard of and will be familiar with, some may not be helpful, but hopefully (maybe) you'll like the sound of just one – or it may even give you a spark of an idea – and you'll find a way of using it on your next camping trip.

Firstly, it is always a good idea to have a Practice Camp – if not in your garden, then in someone else's, or at a quiet spot somewhere where you won't be disturbed. Basically it is much better to get used to your canvas tent and basic gear first, before you pack the car up, drive a good few miles and then discover that you underestimated the time required for pitching and setting up camp. Or worse, that you don't thoroughly understand how to erect the tent in the first place. If you have a bell tent it is one of the easiest tents around to erect – but having said that I have still seen some rather basic mistakes, which have resulted in the tent being unstable, wonky and something that would not resist much of a breeze .

Once properly erected for the first time, and especially if it's in your own garden, a good idea is to furnish it with stuff that you think you'd either (a) need or (b) like to have with you on a camping trip . Take time to work out what you need around you to (a) function and (b) feel comfortable.

So then you can build a check-list of essentials that you 'need' to take on either a short or more basic camp, or alternatively things that you 'would like' to take on a longer, more comfortable camping trip. Categorise things such as bedding, cooking, wet wear, dry wear, hot / cold weather gear, kids stuff, games, relaxation (wine!), Basic kit, glamping items, whatever suits you.

Another 'pre-camp' tip is, split the tent poles, pegs and canvas. Bell tents should come with a main carry bag for the tent and groundsheet, a separate bag for the poles, and another bag for the pegs, mallet, spare ropes etc. This means that you are basically splitting the weight. Even if you use a trolley this makes it much easier to handle the basic tent components.

One final canvas bell tent tip – always use a footprint. A footprint is basically any old (cheap) tarp that you place underneath the actual tent groundsheet. You can buy expensive ones but it really is not necessary. Ensure that the footprint is around 5cm / 2inches smaller than the actual outermost edges of the groundsheet. Using a cheap builders tarp found in any DIY store will do. Then simply cut to size. The idea behind the footprint is that it helps to keep the bulk of the dirt off the underneath of your groundsheet, making pack-up much easier. And it needs to be slightly smaller than your groundsheet to stop rain from running in between the two and 'pooling' under your tent.

Kids usually love camping and being outdoors. They love the freedom, and the resulting dirt! So kids' clothes may need to be frequently changed. A suggestion is to pack kids' clothes in individually rolled bundles. For example, pants, socks, shorts, T-shirts – all rolled into individual bundles and then those bundles packed into some sort of storage case or box. This makes things a lot easier – simply pull out a bundle and hey presto! Clothes for the new day!

Speaking of storage boxes – plastic storage boxes can be easily found these days in a huge mix of sizes and styles. So to use these for packing camping essentials makes sense, as the containers themselves are lightweight, and also stackable. This means they're easily packed into car, and once in your tent, they can be positioned around the tent in strategic positions with a simple cover / throw over the top. They then instantly become transformed into attractive, stable, usable, table-like surfaces.

Yet another reason to take (at least one) plastic storage box with you if you have very young children, is that it can be filled with warm water to create a convenient bath-tub for a youngster. And they'll probably love it!

Speaking of water, if you are camping on a lake, or with a boat or canoe, a brilliant suggestion I once saw was to attach your key (s) to a champagne-type of cork. If the keys are not too heavy, or if you only attach the most important one (or else attach each key to a cork) it will float if dropped into the water! Brilliant!

Another idea for storage is to buy one of those soft plastic or canvas hanging-style shoe-caddy type things. They have multiple 'pockets' into which, unless you really want to store your shoes, you can store kitchen utensils, cloths, candles, corkscrews or other little bits' n bobs. Simply hang the caddy up in your kitchen tent, or on one of the poles inside your tent.

5 Awesome Fall Camping Tips To Make Your Trip More Enjoyable

Many campers love to schedule their trips during autumn season. It’s no surprise though – with the cool weather and the breath-taking fall foliage, you’ll definitely want to be outdoors. There are plenty of fun activities you can enjoy during your fall camping trip. Whether you’ll be camping solo, with family or your camping buddies, autumn season offers numerous options to make your outdoor adventure more fun!

Follow these 5 awesome fall camping tips to make your trip more memorable:

Prepare for the cool weather

Even though summer just ended, you should be prepared for cool weather. Autumn weather is very unpredictable – it could be hot and sunny during the day, but very cold once the sun goes down. You wouldn’t want your trip to be ruined because you keep waking up in the wee hours of the morning cold and shivering.

That’s why you need to come prepared – pack layers of clothing and be ready for a variety of conditions. Make sure your tent and sleeping bag can keep up with the cold, too!

Schedule your cooking times

An important thing to keep in mind is that the days are shorter during cool seasons and more importantly, food takes longer to cook when the weather is cold. Schedule your cooking times accordingly to ensure that you enjoy your mealtimes – be sure you cook dinner and clean up before the sun goes down!

Be bear-aware

Any camper knows that taking safety precautions against bears and other wildlife is always a must, but be extra careful during fall season. Wildlife become more active around this time looking for and stocking up on food as winter nears.

Keep your food in tight, sealed containers away from your tent and make sure you properly dispose of your garbage.

Go Apple or Pumpkin Picking

There are numerous apple orchards in the country and many are near campsites. If you’re lucky enough to have one near your chosen campsite, consider apple picking during the day. To get even more in the spirit of autumn, you can also opt to go pumpkin picking. You can also bring your own pumpkins to carve around the campfire! The kids will love it!

Collect Leaves

Fall foliage is breath-taking with beautiful hues of red, orange and yellow. This makes leaf collecting a great camping activity during the autumn season! Collect different colors, sizes and shapes and place them on a scrapbook as memorabilia.

Follow these fall camping tips to make your outdoor trip more memorable!