The First Time Camper – Top Travel Tips

With summer comes the opportunity to get outside and enjoy the long warm days and the cool crisp nights. It’s a time to leave the confines of the city and head to seclusion of the wild. Leaving your cares and worries behind, so you can simply relax and in turn, relax simply. It’s time to go camping.

So, let’s be honest, for some people the mere thought of camping is far from a vacation. To others, however, it’s a great escape; a chance to spend time outdoors and to reconnect with the spirit of nature. Now, if you’re a first time camper it is important for you understand a few things up front. Unlike staying in a traditional hotel or condo, you have to differentiate between essential items to pack and those that are more luxurious and probably not needed. For example: will you be staying in place that has cell phone service or Wi-Fi? Do you need an entire make-up bag or can you get by with just a few basic items? Most importantly, how do you plan to stay warm, dry, and fed during your camping trip? The key to safe and successful camping is knowing what necessities to bring with you and what to leave behind.

Your needs may be very different depending on the type of camping you plan on doing. If you are camping in a rustic cabin, tent camping at a campground, or hiking into the woods and pitching a tent they will all call for varying items. Since it is a good idea to have some camping experience under your belt before you go off deep into the woods, your best bet is to start by reserving a campsite at a campground. Even then, there are some important thing to consider when packing for your trip.

Utilities

Before you even start to make a list of items to pack, be sure to find out if the campground has available utilities. If they do not provide electricity, for example, then bringing that plug in cappuccino machine won’t be of much use. Alternatively, you can bring battery operated equipment, but be sure to take additional batteries. If the campground offers running water and hot showers, then you don’t have to worry about taking gallons of water to weigh you down. Finally, find out if there is a grill or fire pit provided so you can plan on how you will be cooking your meals. Getting this information ahead of time will go a long way in avoiding unneeded frustration later.

Weather- Plan for Rain

As much as we would all like to think that our trip will be rain free and that weather forecasting is a perfect science, the fact is, it is always best to plane for the worst. This means planning for both rain and sunshine alike. There is nothing worse than waking up in the middle of the night, only to find the floor of your tent soaking wet. So regardless of the forecast, place a tarp or large piece of plastic under your tent to help keep you dry. Also, be sure to have plenty of seam sealer and duct tape, just in case you spring a leak… or two.

While you’re at it, it’s a good idea to also pack some ponchos, raincoats, or umbrellas as well. These items can help you stay dry so that you can still enjoy your activities even when the weather doesn’t want to cooperate. I always like to bring additional socks with me, too. Since there is no clothes dryer nearby, it is pretty miserable to have to go around with wet feet. These items don’t take up much room, so they’re worth adding to your list to pack.

Protect Your Skin

While it can be fun soaking up the warmth of the hot sun, it’s no so fun getting a nasty sunburn. The sun can be deceiving, so make sure to bring sunscreen with a high enough SPF level to keep your skin protected. Generally, this is going to be a SPF of 30 or higher and I tend to prefer the type that won’t run with sweat. Be mindful of younger children, the elderly, and those with fair skin may need a stronger version. Having a hat with a visor to wear while you are out walking, by the lake, or on the water will add an additional layer of protection during those unexpected heat waves.

Protect Yourself from Insects

Regardless where you camp, a few different kinds of insects will probably cross your path. Bring at least one can of insect repellent with you on your trip. You will most likely enjoy the outdoors a lot more if you’re not spending all of your time swatting away pesky pests. That being said, be sure to check your clothes for any insects that might be hiding in there.

Thick Layers

Because warm days can quickly turn to chilly nights, you will want to pack for all occasions. Go ahead and throw a swim suit in your bag, but you will also want to pack a long sleeve shirt, long pants, and a sweatshirt. If you are camping in a warm climate you may not be concerned about the chilly nights, but it is still important to think ahead, consider weather patterns, and pack accordingly. Bottom line; it is always better to peel layers off than to wish you had brought warmer clothing.

Food

One of the greatest things about camping is being able to experiment with cooking. Whatever you decide to cook on your trip, also consider the essential tools to make the process easier. Tinfoil works wonders when cooking vegetables, for example, and don’t forget to bring a spatula or grilling fork if you’re cooking meat. As much as you might like to only pack paper plates and plastic utensils, you will not be very happy when your plastic fork melts while flipping steaks over the campfire. This doesn’t mean you have to pack the whole kitchen (after all the goal is to pack light), but you will want a few multipurpose tools to make your cooking experience a little easier. Finally, if you are packing meats, condiments, or dairy products, be sure to have large enough cooler that will maintain temperature during your trip. Remember, depending on where you are staying, ice may not be readily accessible. You don’t want your food to spoil before it can be eaten.

Planning for a camping trip may seem like a lot of work, but planning ahead and ridding your packing list of unnecessary items can help simplify the process. When all is said and done, the most important things to consider are your basic fundamental needs: food and water, shelter, clothing, and safety. Everything else is optional and can only add to the enjoyment of your camping experience.

Camping is an opportunity to reconnect with nature, enjoy a variety of outdoor activities, and experience a different way of life. Enjoy the essence of camping by leaving a few luxuries behind and getting away from the hustle and bustle of your everyday routine. By keeping it simple and planning ahead, camping can be a fun and stress free way to enjoy the great outdoors while spending quality time with friends and family.

Camping Tips For Seniors – Looking For an Economic Way to Travel

More and more seniors are looking to travel with economical ways to do just that. After all, this is the golden years and what better way to travel then trying your hand at camping. Here are five tips to get you started in camping.

First, research campgrounds of areas that you may want to visit. To do that here are a couple of websites that may help you decide on where to go on your next adventure. One site I would suggest is the National Park Service and the other site is Reserve America. Each site is unique in giving information about camping by state, campsite maps, locate by activity and camping gear suggestions.

Secondly, you ask yourself what I would camp in. Of course, owning a RV would be nice and a more comfortable way to travel. That is something you can think about later if you plan on doing a lot of camping in the future. Even so, there is nothing wrong to begin your camping experiences in a decent tent at a more affordable price. Tents come in all sizes and shapes try to find the right one that will meet your needs. You can find them on line or better yet would be to see them in person at a sporting goods store that sells tents. Therefore, you would get a better perspective of the size that you would need. Another thought is you do not have to sleep on the ground if you have an aero bed and a big enough tent it will fit nicely.

Thirdly, the next area of concern is camping equipment. Everything from a camp stove, sleeping bag, cookware, and coolers. Believe it or not you may already have a lot of these items available to you. However, one of the most important items would be a camp stove to cook on. Car camping stoves work very efficiently to cook up sumptuous meals just like home. You can even use the pots and pans you have at home to begin your camp kitchen supplies.

Next, think about planning your meals a head of time. Preparing them at home not only will save time but money as well. Look in your cupboards and refrigerator for smaller items such as coffee, graham crackers, mustard, ketchup, mayo, and seasonings. Granted, look for items missed from your checklist on the road but try local vendors for fresh fruits and vegetables and discount stores instead. Why not ask about senior discounts as well. In addition, purchase blocked ice for the cooler it will last longer.

Lastly, look into a National Park Pass for seniors. They cost you $10.00 dollars, which will give you some wonderful price breaks in camping and other amenities. If you are 62 years of age or older and proof of age you may buy these passes at any national park. Check out this website for more information on this pass http://store.usgs.gov/pass/index.html. Happy travels!

Top Camping Tips For a Smooth Trip

Anyone who has ever been camping will have a few camping tips to share, and so here are just a few that I've acquired over time. I do not claim to have invented these ideas but they are things that have stuck in my head. Some you may have heard of and will be familiar with, some may not be helpful, but hopefully (maybe) you'll like the sound of just one – or it may even give you a spark of an idea – and you'll find a way of using it on your next camping trip.

Firstly, it is always a good idea to have a Practice Camp – if not in your garden, then in someone else's, or at a quiet spot somewhere where you won't be disturbed. Basically it is much better to get used to your canvas tent and basic gear first, before you pack the car up, drive a good few miles and then discover that you underestimated the time required for pitching and setting up camp. Or worse, that you don't thoroughly understand how to erect the tent in the first place. If you have a bell tent it is one of the easiest tents around to erect – but having said that I have still seen some rather basic mistakes, which have resulted in the tent being unstable, wonky and something that would not resist much of a breeze .

Once properly erected for the first time, and especially if it's in your own garden, a good idea is to furnish it with stuff that you think you'd either (a) need or (b) like to have with you on a camping trip . Take time to work out what you need around you to (a) function and (b) feel comfortable.

So then you can build a check-list of essentials that you 'need' to take on either a short or more basic camp, or alternatively things that you 'would like' to take on a longer, more comfortable camping trip. Categorise things such as bedding, cooking, wet wear, dry wear, hot / cold weather gear, kids stuff, games, relaxation (wine!), Basic kit, glamping items, whatever suits you.

Another 'pre-camp' tip is, split the tent poles, pegs and canvas. Bell tents should come with a main carry bag for the tent and groundsheet, a separate bag for the poles, and another bag for the pegs, mallet, spare ropes etc. This means that you are basically splitting the weight. Even if you use a trolley this makes it much easier to handle the basic tent components.

One final canvas bell tent tip – always use a footprint. A footprint is basically any old (cheap) tarp that you place underneath the actual tent groundsheet. You can buy expensive ones but it really is not necessary. Ensure that the footprint is around 5cm / 2inches smaller than the actual outermost edges of the groundsheet. Using a cheap builders tarp found in any DIY store will do. Then simply cut to size. The idea behind the footprint is that it helps to keep the bulk of the dirt off the underneath of your groundsheet, making pack-up much easier. And it needs to be slightly smaller than your groundsheet to stop rain from running in between the two and 'pooling' under your tent.

Kids usually love camping and being outdoors. They love the freedom, and the resulting dirt! So kids' clothes may need to be frequently changed. A suggestion is to pack kids' clothes in individually rolled bundles. For example, pants, socks, shorts, T-shirts – all rolled into individual bundles and then those bundles packed into some sort of storage case or box. This makes things a lot easier – simply pull out a bundle and hey presto! Clothes for the new day!

Speaking of storage boxes – plastic storage boxes can be easily found these days in a huge mix of sizes and styles. So to use these for packing camping essentials makes sense, as the containers themselves are lightweight, and also stackable. This means they're easily packed into car, and once in your tent, they can be positioned around the tent in strategic positions with a simple cover / throw over the top. They then instantly become transformed into attractive, stable, usable, table-like surfaces.

Yet another reason to take (at least one) plastic storage box with you if you have very young children, is that it can be filled with warm water to create a convenient bath-tub for a youngster. And they'll probably love it!

Speaking of water, if you are camping on a lake, or with a boat or canoe, a brilliant suggestion I once saw was to attach your key (s) to a champagne-type of cork. If the keys are not too heavy, or if you only attach the most important one (or else attach each key to a cork) it will float if dropped into the water! Brilliant!

Another idea for storage is to buy one of those soft plastic or canvas hanging-style shoe-caddy type things. They have multiple 'pockets' into which, unless you really want to store your shoes, you can store kitchen utensils, cloths, candles, corkscrews or other little bits' n bobs. Simply hang the caddy up in your kitchen tent, or on one of the poles inside your tent.

5 Useful Tips For Camping In The Rain

Even if you know the weather forecast during your camping trip, there's always a chance that it will rain so you always have to come prepared. If it does, the fun does not end there. In fact, there are plenty of ways you can make your stay comfortable and even more fun even though it's pouring outside. Remember, don't think of it as an inconvenience, think of it as a challenge!

Try these awesome tips for camping in wet weather:

Invest in the right tent

The outdoors are unpredictable so you always have to be prepared no matter what the weather is. If you plan to go camping during the rainy season, buying a good quality tent with built-in vents. The vents will help prevent condensation inside. If purchasing a new one is out of the question, you can opt to re-proof your old one. Use a tent proofer spray to restore your tent's ability to repel water.

Bring a gazebo

A gazebo will help greatly when you're camping in wet weather. It will shelter and protect you, your tent and your gear from the rain. This means that you can still enjoy being outside of your tent without getting wet.

Think about storage

Resealable plastic bags will be useful for storing clothes, toiletries and other small items when you're outdoors. They are waterproof, too, that's why they're ideal for the rainy season. Don't forget to store wet and dry items separately and make sure you have dry clothes to keep you warm when you're inside the tent. Seal food items tightly to keep them fresh and to avoid water from getting in.

Don't forget to protect yourself

Your gear is all set, but you also need the right clothing and accessories for yourself – nobody wants to catch a cold and be unable to enjoy while out on an outdoor trip. Arm yourself with a waterproof jacket, trousers and boots. Keep bug repellants ready (many tend to come out in wet weather) and pack a microfiber towel – they're compact, absorbent and dries quickly.

Plan fun activities

There are still some fun outdoor activities you can do even when it's pouring. Play board games, bring out the guitar or tell ghost stories with kids to keep them entertained.

Camping in the rain doesn't have to be a hassle – with the right gear and attitude, you're still sure to have a memorable trip!

Tips for Camping With Just an ATV

There is nothing more peaceful than sitting around a campfire enjoying a night under the stars or snuggled up in a tent telling ghost stories. But, some of the most beautiful places to camp are only accessible by an All-Terrain Vehicle. Whether it’s a weekend getaway or a month-long adventure, preparing and packing for an ATV camping trip can be overwhelming. It’s not just the destination that counts, it’s also the equipment you choose to take (or don’t take). Here are a few tips on having an amazing camping trip by only taking what can fit on your ATV.

1. Plan in Advance

Camping with an ATV can pose a few more kinks than a normal camping trip. Because of this, it is important to plan a little more extensively. Have a map on hand so that you can easily tell where you are going and to help you get back on track should you lose your way. As you would get your car or SUV inspected before a long road trip, the same needs to be done for your ATV. And with any planned vacation, always have a back-up plan. No matter how hard you try to prepare, things happen!

2. Pack Smart:

Taking only your ATV means you will need to pack only the essential items. Prioritizing your packing list will make carrying a limited amount of gear and supplies much easier. So, what are the must-haves for an ATV camping trip?

  • Safe equipment
  • Sleeping bag
  • Tent
  • Clothing
  • Weather specific gear
  • Food
  • Cooking equipment
  • Tools

3. ATV Top-Shelf Rack:

The Top-Shelf can carry anything from boats to lumber to camping gear. With all of its accessories, you can go anywhere, do anything, and bring whatever you want with you. It is great for hauling lumber and supplies around your farm, carrying your camping gear to the top of the mountain, hauling kayaks from the hard to reach river banks, or anything else you can think of. Add-ons allow you to convert your ATV into a hunting blind, barbwire winder or boom wench. All this can be done while toting your gun, bow, or shovel with the secure bracket.

4. Pack Simple Meals:

Bring simple meals that can easily be cooked over a fire or that require no cooking or refrigeration such as freeze-dried meals, instant oatmeal, granola bars, and canned goods. All of these produce nothing to clean up after and they all cook up quickly with boiling water.

5. Focus on the Beauty:

There will be moments when you miss the conveniences of your usual camping equipment but, ignore the inconveniences and focus on the beauty of the scenery. To fully understand and embrace your surroundings, take time to get off your ATV and explore by foot.

Getting a group together on a camping trip with just an ATV can help build lasting memories. If done right, they can be a huge adventure and they may become your go-to camping style after a few practice runs. Above all else, when going camping, be aware of your surroundings and be safe!

Amazing Camping Tips and Tricks

Want to make the next camping trip really enjoyable and impress your campmates with your incredible knowledge of outdoor tricks? Here are some amazing snippets of useful tips that will make them wonder how you acquired such information. A warning though: you have to swear to keep these things secret. Like a magician, you never reveal your sources.

– Rub liquid soap on the outside of pots and pans. The black soot will come right off after cooking over an open fire.

-Keep the bottom of your pots that you use over the open fire clean by wrapping them in tinfoil.

– Spray flies or bees with hairspray and watch them run for cover

-Spray your garbage and trash with ammonia to keep animals away.

-Sleep naked in your sleeping bag. It will reflect your body heat back to you

-Use baking soda to rid your clothes and hands of cooking odors so the bears won’t smell food on you.

– Take some warmth from the campfire or stove to bed. Keep a pot of hot water simmering on the campfire and when you turn in fill up water bottles and place them in your sleeping bag.

-Buy orange juice in plastic bags and freeze it so it can be used instead of ice in the cooler. Then,when it thaws out you have refreshing cold juice for later.

-Take a headlamp, instead of a flashlight,so your hands are free

– When finished eating an orange, wipe exposed skin with the inside of the peel. Insects will stay far away from you.

-To cut down on cooking time of baked potatoes, start the potatoes in your microwave and bake till half done before you leave. Wrap them in aluminum foil and toss in the cooler until yo need them.

-Old shower curtains make great ground tarps to pitch your tent on.

-Waterproof matches by dipping them in nail polish.

-Waterproof matches by dipping in melted paraffin.

-To Dry wet socks, sleep with them around your middle. Your body heat during the night and your warm sleeping bag will dry them by morning.

– Whenever you leave camp always have a watch, a whistle, a cell phone, a flashlight and a knife with you in case of emergency.

-Bottles with sticky contents (corn syrup, honey, maple syrup) can get harder to open so before using the bottle for the first time, wipe the threads with a light coating of cooking oil. The lid will never stick and won’t be difficult to open or you can wrap a small bit of plastic over the bottle opening after you open it.

-To keep warmer at night wear a hat to sleep in. You lose 80% of your heat heat through your head.

-Use glow sticks for a bit of soft light at night.

– To hang a lantern, get those lightweight metal rods that are used for hanging plants and stick them in the ground.

5 Awesome Fall Camping Tips To Make Your Trip More Enjoyable

Many campers love to schedule their trips during autumn season. It’s no surprise though – with the cool weather and the breath-taking fall foliage, you’ll definitely want to be outdoors. There are plenty of fun activities you can enjoy during your fall camping trip. Whether you’ll be camping solo, with family or your camping buddies, autumn season offers numerous options to make your outdoor adventure more fun!

Follow these 5 awesome fall camping tips to make your trip more memorable:

Prepare for the cool weather

Even though summer just ended, you should be prepared for cool weather. Autumn weather is very unpredictable – it could be hot and sunny during the day, but very cold once the sun goes down. You wouldn’t want your trip to be ruined because you keep waking up in the wee hours of the morning cold and shivering.

That’s why you need to come prepared – pack layers of clothing and be ready for a variety of conditions. Make sure your tent and sleeping bag can keep up with the cold, too!

Schedule your cooking times

An important thing to keep in mind is that the days are shorter during cool seasons and more importantly, food takes longer to cook when the weather is cold. Schedule your cooking times accordingly to ensure that you enjoy your mealtimes – be sure you cook dinner and clean up before the sun goes down!

Be bear-aware

Any camper knows that taking safety precautions against bears and other wildlife is always a must, but be extra careful during fall season. Wildlife become more active around this time looking for and stocking up on food as winter nears.

Keep your food in tight, sealed containers away from your tent and make sure you properly dispose of your garbage.

Go Apple or Pumpkin Picking

There are numerous apple orchards in the country and many are near campsites. If you’re lucky enough to have one near your chosen campsite, consider apple picking during the day. To get even more in the spirit of autumn, you can also opt to go pumpkin picking. You can also bring your own pumpkins to carve around the campfire! The kids will love it!

Collect Leaves

Fall foliage is breath-taking with beautiful hues of red, orange and yellow. This makes leaf collecting a great camping activity during the autumn season! Collect different colors, sizes and shapes and place them on a scrapbook as memorabilia.

Follow these fall camping tips to make your outdoor trip more memorable!

5 Essential Camping Tips and Tricks For First-Timers

Planning a trip with hotel accommodations can be quite a handful, what more if you’re planning a camping trip for the first time? It may seem overwhelming at first, but don’t worry – with the right approach, the entire trip, from start to finish, will be smooth-sailing. Just remember to enjoy yourself, because it’s not going to be the last.

Here are 5 essential camping tips and tricks for first-timers:

Do as much research as you can beforehand

When choosing your camp site, it is vital that you learn everything about it. Do you need to book in advance? Do they allow pets? Do they have space for camper vans or just tents? What amenities do they offer? It is most ideal to check their website and make a phone call to make sure that all your inquiries are properly answered. It is also a good idea to check out online reviews.

Observe the weather

Check the weather forecasts frequently in the days leading up to your trip. You don’t just want to assume that the weather will be good, plan out your itinerary for the day and find out you can’t do any of it because of the rain. Weather is unpredictable so it’s best to pack extra blankets, more clothing and some rain gear. Also plan out doable activities that can be enjoyed in any type of weather.

Make a check list of essential things to bring

Don’t worry about over packing, it’s your first time after all. You’ll learn how to pack light as your camping experience grows. In the meantime, stick to a check list. Apart from camping gear, food and water, don’t forget important things like toiletries, utensils, medicines etc. Always bring extra everything. Experts also advise trying your gear at home first to make sure everything works fine.

Prepare for the long drive

Aside from the camp grounds, you’ll also be spending a lot of time in the car on your way. It doesn’t have to be a drag, it can also be an enjoyable time. Prepare your favourite music, play games in the car, have food and snacks ready.

Enjoy yourself

The most important thing is to enjoy camping. Don’t stick to a strict itinerary – go with the flow. Things are unpredictable outdoors and you’d just get disappointed if things didn’t go as planned.

These essential camping tips and tricks are ideal for beginners such as yourself!

5 Solo Camping Tips You Have To Know About

To go on a camping trip all by yourself sure is an exciting thing! There’s nothing like being in nature alone and being able to explore, relax and do fun activities all on your own terms. But solo camping is equally nerve-wrecking, especially for first-timers. It’s normal to wonder if you’ll be safe out there.

There’s definitely no telling, but there are plenty of precautions you can take to make sure that you not only have an incredible time, but you’re safe as well!

Here are 5 solo camping tips you have to know about:

Choose a safe and secure campsite

The first most important step you need to do is to choose the right campsite. Select one that many solo campers frequent, somewhere safe and secure, preferably with a ranger you can contact any time. Don’t choose a campsite that’s too isolated and at the same time, don’t go for one that’s too exposed (one along a highway).

Be in the know

Careful planning and preparation is highly important if you’re camping solo. Whether you’re going for a hike or will be mostly staying at your campsite, it’s important to research the area/s you plan to go as much as you can.

Do research on your chosen campground and know all the possible routes to get there. Check nearby hospitals, convenience stores, water sources, alternative trails and reference landmarks. You should also get to know the area’s trails, flora and fauna, wildlife and the like beforehand.

Stay in touch

Before you leave, you should have a contact person at home (someone who’s always open for communication). Leave your itinerary with that person and update him daily with your whereabouts. Get the camp ranger’s contact number, too – he should be the first person you call in case of an emergency.

Set up a comfortable camp

Whether you’re camping in your car, RV or a tent, you should aim to set up a shelter that’s comfortable. This way you’ll be able to relax and feel rested for each day’s outdoor activities. Your obstacle may be the environment itself, not humans or nature.

Bring enough supplies

From your gear, your clothes to your food and water, you should have enough to cover your entire trip. Plan your food by meal per day, with extras in case you get hungry between meals.

Follow these solo camping tips for a smooth-sailing solitary adventure outdoors!

Invisalign Care Tips When Going Camping This Summer

Invisalign teeth straightening aligners are the ideal way to create a healthy, beautiful smile without the need for bulky metal braces or wires. While the invisible aligners let you enjoy orthodontic care without anyone knowing, it’s important to ensure you take care of your aligners at all times.

Failing to keep the aligners clean can cause bacteria to build up. Dry saliva and plaque both encourage bacteria growth, which can produce a foul smell. If the bacteria is allowed to continue building up, the clear plastic can become discolored.

When you’re at home and living your normal daily routine, caring for your Invisalign retainer is easy. However, looking after your oral hygiene care needs is a little more challenging when you’re going camping.

Here are some Invisalign care tips to make it easier to keep them clean when you’re away from home.

Pack an oral hygiene bag: Take the time to pack a portable oral hygiene kit that you can take with you on your camping trip. You should include your toothbrush and toothpaste, floss, and your Invisalign cleaning kit.

Rinse: Always take the time to rinse your aligners properly whenever you remove them. Invisalign was designed to be easily removed whenever you eat, so be sure you rinse them before you start your meal. When you’re finished eating, rinse your aligners again before putting them back into your mouth.

Soak: Take the opportunity to soak your Invisalign retainers while you’re eating. After you’ve rinsed the aligners, pop them into a tray to soak while you’re eating. You might use your official Invisalign cleaning crystals or you might have packed another brand of denture cleaner.

Brush and floss your teeth: One of the more convenient aspects of straightening your teeth with Invisalign is that you won’t be struggling to brush or floss in between brackets and wires. Simply brush and floss your teeth as normal.

Brush your aligners: You might also want to gently brush your aligners before putting them back into your mouth again. Be sure you rinse your toothbrush and only use water when brushing your Invisalign braces, as some brands of toothpaste could be abrasive and cause damage.

Keeping your invisible teeth straightening retainers clean and sanitized doesn’t have to be difficult just because you’re going camping. The key is to be prepared in advance with your oral hygiene needs.

Find opportunities to work your cleaning needs into your normal routine. For example, choosing to rinse and soak your aligners while you’re eating minimizes the time you have them out of your mouth and reduces the need to spend more time later on cleaning and soaking. After all, you need to remove them while you eat anyway, so get both tasks done at the same time.